Silkroad Online Forums

A community forum for the free online game Silkroad Online. Discuss Silkroad Online, read up on guides, and build your character and skills.

Faq Search Members Chat  Register Profile Login

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 1:00 am 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
WELCOME
Image

One of the best things I like about SRF's Artist Corner is the diversity of its regular members. Unlike most forums that aren't dedicated to graphic design or art in general, the work of our artists here are not simply limited to anime/game "sigs" or "tags"; our collection range anywhere from signature making, to drawing, to photography, and everything else in between. Although I'm not certain how many of you are actually interested in photography, it would be at least safe to assume that a large number of people here find some fascination when looking through galleries filled with wonderful photographs, both black & white and in color. Whether you already have, you are planning to, or you're reluctant to pick up a camera and start "shooting," I want to create a small thread where people can learn from one another about photography - both basics and advanced information. I hope that by the end of the day, people here can realize that the art of recording light is a lot more than just pushing a camera button.

Let's begin with the basics:


1. Shutter Speed
photgraphy.about.com wrote:
One of the most requested photography tips is shutter speed help. Shutter speed is one of the most basic important controls on a camera. Shutter speed controls the amount of time that your film, or digital sensor, is exposed to light. In effect, the shutter determines what image is captured on your film. The shutter is a small plastic sheet that opens and closes to allow light onto the film or prevent light from reaching the film. The shutter is opened when you press the shutter release button on your camera to take a picture. The shutter speed determines how long the shutter remains open.

Spoiler!

The term 'shutter speed' is a pretty self-explanatory term. In most digital SLRs, like the Canon EOS series, the mode that gives you full control of this function is displayed as Tv (Time Value). This setting will allow you to manipulate the amount of time you wish to expose the camera's sensor to light while the rest is automatically regulated by it. If you are new to photography and recently got yourself a dSLR, this is a good place to start. Although it sounds simple, regulating this function can make the difference between being able to capture a moment correctly or missing out on it altogether.

This setting is also responsible for capturing the subject's movement. Shutter speed is measured in numbers - whole, mixed, and fraction. Shooting a moving subject, for example a moving car, at a speed of 1 second (displayed as 1") will result in a completely blurry image - at least that of the vehicle. This is because the sensor/film is exposed for a whole second, which is enough time for the car to move a couple of feet from the time the shutter opened to the moment it closed. On the other hand, taking a picture of the same vehicle at 1/300th of a second (displayed as 300) or higher will record it in the picture as a still subject with most of its details intact. This is the same idea behind photos of people "suspended" or "frozen" in mid-air during a jump or fall.

However, this does not mean that shooting images for 1 second or longer is completely useless. Perhaps you want to take an image of a non-moving object in the middle of a moving crowd? Setting the camera to shoot for 3 seconds would record the moving people in a blurry state - this is called "motion blur." It will reduce the number of distractions in order to place the focus on the main object you wanted to photograph. Of course, there are other ways and factors that affects blurring of images but we'll get to those later. Another setting where you would benefit from long exposure would be night time and fireworks photography. Since the amount of light at night is very limited, prolonging the exposure would allow you to capture more details of a city skyline after dark. As for fireworks, unless you wish to take a picture of several "dots" of light, it would be necessary to set the shutter speed for a couple of seconds in order to record motion - which would look more like the lines of lights we normally see in pictures of July 4th celebrations and New Year's Eve parties.


2. Aperture
Spoiler!

Aperture, in my opinion, is one of the more challenging aspects of photography basics. Shutter speed affects the duration/time in which light touches the film/sensor. On the other hand, aperture affects the amount of light that enters the camera. The most popular analogy for this is the pupil or hole in your eye where light enters - when the pupil opens up or dilates, more light passes through. On the contrary, when the size of the pupil becomes more narrow or constricts, less light is allowed in. Aperture is measured in "f/ stops." A lower f/ stop number means a wider aperture, and a higher number, of course, would be more narrow. For the sake of keeping things simple, I really want to avoid going into detail about that but just know this basic information for now. I understand that most of you get the concept but one question still remains: "How does that affect the photograph?" This is when depth of field (DOF) comes in.

Depth of field can be described as the amount of space in the field in front of the camera that is in focus. It determines how much of it would appear as sharp and detailed and how much of it would be blurry (and how blurry they are). Imagine you're in a straight narrow hallway and there's 3 items in front of you: 1 item is placed 5 feet away, the next one is 10 feet away, and the other one is 15 feet away. Now picture an imaginary block about 3 feet thick - that is your depth of field. Anything that's inside this imaginary block will appear detailed, and anything that is not will be blurred. As the aperture becomes wider (lower number - bigger hole), the thickness of the imaginary block becomes smaller and vice versa. You will adjust the placement or distance of the imaginary block from you using the focus ring. So if that block, which is 3 feet wide, focuses on the 2nd item (10 feet away), it then becomes focused while the other 2 items will appear blurred. That is aperture in a nutshell.


For a "slightly" more detailed explanation of f/ stops: CLICK


3. ISO (ASA)
Spoiler!

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) or ASA (American Standards Association) are interchangeable terms for defining film sensitivity to light or in digital, sensor speed. There's a slight difference between the two but they are pretty much the same; for the sake of simplicity, most photographers just view them as being completely similar. For this section, I will be referring to it as "ISO" just to avoid being too repetitive and to keep the dialogue to a minimum. The main thing you have to remember in ISO, both in film and digital, is that the higher the ISO number, the less light you need to capture an image - that means that the film/sensor has a higher sensitivity to light. This knowledge is very useful for shooting in places where natural light (the sun) is not available or the place simply has inadequate light. So now all you have to do when light is too dim is to hit that ISO number all the way to 1600 or higher to get all the details right? Sorry, but no.

As our common intuition would tell us, there's always a catch. Ever wonder where all that dust comes from in a lot of black & white photographs? That is called film grain. And of course, there's also a digital equivalent for film grain - it's called noise. Although I find film grain to have some form of an artistic quality (especially in B/W), most people find digital noise to be quite irritating; they appear as tiny red, blue, and green dots and streaks/lines scattered across the image - yuck!

In order to minimize grain/noise, it would be highly advisable to shoot with low ISO. Preferably anywhere between 100-800 for digital and 400 for film. There are numerous programs available to reduce digital noise, including Photoshop, but they can only do so much and they cause some damage to the quality of the photo. Therefore, it would in your best interest to get it right the first time.

4. Light Meter and Exposure
Spoiler!

photography.about.com wrote:
A light meter is an instrument inside your camera that tells you if the amount of light reaching the film will be enough or too much to properly expose your image. The light meter takes into account your shutter speed, film speed, and aperture settings.


Assuming that you've read through Shutter Speed, Aperture, and Film Speed (ISO/ASA) and understood the concept behind them, it's time to put all that knowledge together and start shooting manual! Setting these three factors will determine the amount of light that goes into your camera and how it is recorded either via film or digital sensor. How do you know if the exposure is at your desired level? There's a tool for that - it's called a light meter. The light meter is usually a built-in device in most "professional" cameras such as SLRs (Single Lens Reflex). The light meter helps you determine whether the photo you're about to take is either underexposed, overexposed, or correctly exposed.

The two ends, usually marked by either a positive/negative symbol (+/-) or a number (-2/+2), represents the exposure level; negative/-2 being completely underexposed and vice versa (therefore, the middle (0) is "correct exposure.")

Although it sounds like a very handy tool, you have to keep in mind that it is only there to assist you - not to lead. There's a couple of things you have to remember about the light meter:

First of all, the light meter responds to the amount of light located at and around the center of the view finder. Which means that if you're taking an outdoor picture, for example a city skyline, and your camera is pointed at the building, the resulting photograph will show the sky as overexposed and full of blown-out highlights. Pointing the camera at the sky and setting a correct exposure for it will result in the buildings being underexposed. This is when your artistic skills come in play - you have to determine a balance between the two (there's always a way to fix that later on but that will be discussed in a different topic.)

Next, you have to remember your three basics - duration of exposure (motion control), depth of field, and film speed. The exposure is simply a combination of these three factors - therefore, even though the level of exposure is the same, the method of recording the photo and its effects on the final product will be different. Different scenes require different priorities. You have to understand that all three factors compensate for each other in order to determine the correct exposure; for example, exposing the film for 1" (1 second) at f/22 will show the same exposure level as taking it for 1/125 of a second at f/8. However, based on your knowledge of aperture and shutter speed, you know for sure that the result will be very different. Rule-of-thumb: If focus is a moving subject, prioritize shutter speed. If you're focus is a still object, prioritize aperture (DOF). If it's a combination of both, that really depends on how you want your photo to appear.

Here's a small guideline on what factor to prioritize depending on what picture you're taking:
photography.about.com wrote:
Is Motion Control(MC) or Depth of Field (DOF) More Important?
* Landscapes - DOF
* Sports - MC
* Posed Portraits - DOF
* Nature Photography - DOF & MC
* Photojournalism - DOF & MC
* Architecture - DOF


:yay: That's all for now, folks! :yay:


Spoiler!




[Please let me know if you see anything that needs to be corrected or improved in both content information and grammar/spelling. All written content, except from quoted material, was written by me and is exclusively for www.silkroadforums.com only. If you wish to share this information to anyone, please send them a link; do not copy-paste and claim it as your own. Thank you for respecting my work.]


If you wish to contribute or request information regarding a certain topic, please do not hesitate to ask. It would also be pretty interesting to have other people with knowledge about photography to contribute to this. Hopefully if it draws enough attention, it'll get a sticky.

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Last edited by inky on Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:51 am, edited 23 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 2:17 am 
Advanced Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 2341
Location: Limbo
Bravo good sir.

_________________
My attention span is


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:12 am 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Thanks =p

I'll finish it tomorrow =/

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:15 am 
Forum Legend
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 7320
Location: Canada
That was like my Gr10 Photography class right there.

_________________
Image

ExSoldier/Skyve/Loki

what is life even


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:22 am 
Loyal Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1789
Location:
Artist Corner
I honestly thought DOF was the other way around. No wonder my shots suck.
Soooo, I got out my D60 35mm f/1.8 and took some shots of my messy bed. Had I done this earlier...
Spoiler!
Thanks!

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:24 am 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Sticking to basics for now. It'll go in depth later on. I'm thinking of posting a specific subject each week. For example, next week I might do HDR, the following I'll do macro, then IR. And so on.

@DS:
You're welcome =p I want f/ 1.8 on my Canon too :( I got 1.8 on my K1000 though =/
I got a standard 28-135mm f/ 3.5-5.6 IS USM - gets the job done but not as well as I want it to. I equipped someone's f/ 1.2 lens last week for a bit...holy shit that was a sweet lens!

Anyway, I'll finish the rest tomorrow evening. ISO/ASA in detail and the Light Meter - and tips on getting correct lighting/exposure. I'll also enlighten some people on what I just mentioned to DS regarding lenses - how to pick your lens and avoid getting ripped off.

Goodnight.

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:24 pm 
Loyal Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1789
Location:
Artist Corner
Yea, Nikon has an amazingly cheap DX 35mm lens at f1.8 for $200. At that price it was an impulse buy. If you have an adapter it's definitely worth the money.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:45 pm 
Retired Admin
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 8237
Location: BF3 waiting for BF4
Jebus,

That looks amazing, didnt finish it all, but definitely will give it a read. I love learning things about Photography :)

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:38 pm 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Thanks guys. I'll try to get the first section done by tonight and maybe do a weekly update.

@DS:
I think you can get a converted for Canon lenses to go into a Nikon body but not the other way around. Nikon Film camera lens are also compatible with digital ones but not Canon (at least I haven't seen one that fits the EF mount).

Canon quality is considered by most people to better compared to Nikon (flame shield on lol.) But it's also way too expensive and doesn't give you as much chances to save money as Nikon does.


The 1.8 price for Canon isn't that bad but I've been looking at zooming ones with a constant wide aperture instead of an adjusting one. But I might drop by B&H to get this:
http://www.google.com/products/catalog? ... 8wIwADgA#p

Either that or wait a bit longer for a 1.2 :banghead:

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:14 pm 
Loyal Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1789
Location:
Artist Corner
inky wrote:
Spoiler!


Actually it's the other way around on everything except for that opinion you stuck in there (good thing you got your flame shield on).

http://photo.net/filters-bags-tripods-a ... rum/009kjO
It is Nikon to EOS body.

Nikons are generally more expensive than comparable Canons as well.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:39 pm 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Oh my bad. Misread that part I guess. Although I never considered using a lens adapter. I remember doing some research on it before but I guess my memory got distorted =/

And Canon lenses are more expensive in most cases. =p
http://askville.amazon.com/lenses-expen ... Id=2507968

Also, first section is FINALLY FINISHED! :sohappy:
Someone proofread it please =p

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2010 1:06 am 
Loyal Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1789
Location:
Artist Corner
I was thinking more of this vs this.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2010 1:17 am 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Check specs =p

Speaking of expensive cameras, I want that fucking Leica M7 (top picture) so bad. Sweet looking camera, great quality material, and amazing IQ. But for $6500?!

Idk. Seems like nothing more than a luxury camera.

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2010 5:48 pm 
Loyal Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1789
Location:
Artist Corner
Perhaps, you're right. A lot has changed in the last two years. I remember when I was looking for my first camera Canon's were less expensive than Nikon's pretty much all across the board.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:27 am 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Which one should I do next?

1-Choosing your equipment: Camera, Lens, Accessories (and proper care tips)
2-Composition and Shooting Manual

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:28 am 
Advanced Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 2341
Location: Limbo
Compp!

_________________
My attention span is


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 7:51 pm 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
I'll try to do Comp next week. Probably around Thursday/Friday.

I've been going to a couple of model workshops lately. Usually "paparazzi" (1 or 2 models, multiple photographers) style for now though. But been talking to some models in my friend list so I might start working with them when our schedule eases up. =)

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Sun Oct 31, 2010 7:24 pm 
Frequent Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 1236
Location:
Off Topic
Inky is that Leica yours :shock:, if so I envy you

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Sun Oct 31, 2010 7:36 pm 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Oh hell no... I fucking wish.

My main camera is a Canon 50D. Back up film cam = Pentax K1000.

And a bunch of other shit that don't count after those 2 lol.

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2010 9:22 pm 
Common Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 161
Location: Melbourne
Great thread inky!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2010 10:04 pm 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Thanks =)

-Check the stats out.
http://www.sigmaphoto.com/shop/sd1-dslr-sigma

Goddamn...

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2010 10:13 pm 
Veteran Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 3119
Location: Canada,On
I'm still reading through the majestic first post but always get side tracked. I promise, inky, one of these days I will find the time to read it! you have my word! *puts on viking helmet*


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 1:10 am 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Cool 8)

I don't have any exams next week so I think I can manage to write the 2nd topic by the end of the week, depending on whether or not I finish proofreading and editing our group's 15-page report. I'm not sure if I want to do composition yet since it's something I wanted to do in collaboration with someone. It's because the aspects and guidelines ("rules") are very much similar to other art disciplines and it would be pretty interesting to see what people who excel in graphic design or sculpting would have to say about composition. Depth, rule-of-thirds, symmetry (asymmetry), "flow," and other elements are among these things. Besides, I need to do more reading myself. There's a book I want to read called "The Golden Ratio", which pretty much goes in depth on why the rule-of-thirds (or the number behind it) is visually appealing to most people...maybe when I have time to breath from school/work/social stuff (or whatever is left of it). In conclusion, I don't think composition is a topic that I can (or should be) rushed.

I might do a topic on equipment or HDR...either one.

Spoiler!

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 8:23 am 
Frequent Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 1236
Location:
Off Topic
inky wrote:
Oh hell no... I fucking wish.

My main camera is a Canon 50D. Back up film cam = Pentax K1000.

And a bunch of other shit that don't count after those 2 lol.


That's cool. My dad's a professional photographer so I luckily have access to some cool cameras and lenses, one thing I don't like about it though, the camera's and lenses are all professional grade quality and thus you can't easily take them with into the city for some street photography. I do like the smaller cameras for that.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 11:58 am 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Lol I have no trouble taking my cameras to the city. But I always keep them in a bag and assemble them when I'm ready to start shooting. I simply don't get people who walk around with a bulky dSLR in the subway at night. That's a robbery waiting to happen.

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 5:16 am 
Common Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 161
Location: Melbourne
Inky, you must take your camera to the city one time! I'd love to see some of your pictures of Manhattan. In return, I will do one of Melbourne :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 12:01 pm 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
I finally managed to have some time to process a couple of the pictures last night. I'll resize/upload them later when I get home. I got class right now.

I won't start shooting serious projects until next year since I need an entire crew for those. But I might do a collaboration with someone from the art department for a cohesive mixed media piece.

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 12:41 pm 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Sorry for the late update guys. I've been really busy with school/work/extra crap I gotta do. I'll try to write the new materials once I get some room to breathe.

Update:
Getting tired of city shots..seriously, they're boring as fuck. I feel like a goddamn tourist. :banghead:

So...I decided to go scouting for some good places to shoot. And guess what...I found a freakin carousel in the middle of a "forest," 10 minutes away from my place...in New York!!! :yay:
Also, since that one's not really working - although there's a movie shoot going on in that area right now (which is how I noticed it) - I can do whatever the hell I want there but no lights. So I'll have to scout around for another carousel with not that many people and open lights...during the goddamn winter. I have to check Bryant park for that though. Fml....

But I'm really against the idea of shooting just the carousel since anyone can just do that..nothing to it. Still life has its appeal but it gets old really fast. So, I really need a model for it. I got a few ones I can work with but I wanna' try to make it a collaboration with the girlfriend so it's gonna have to wait until she comes back late December. :soosad:

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 12:56 pm 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Monte Isom is coming to our school this Friday as a guest speaker. But there's a lot more to it than that.

Photo Club VP wrote:
monte isom is coming on behalf of photographers everywhere. he is coming at this point to prove a point to the school. the school has run us around in circles and stopped us at every point they could and today they decided to tell us that we were late on him signing a bullshit contract and that they wouldnt pay. needle...ss to say he has left the student government a nice long message about how to not conduct business and that they fucking blow balls and he is coming for free FOR ME, so please guys, best behavior lol and really show him how much we apprecaite all he is doing.


The man earned mine and a lot of other people's respect for this. =)

http://www.monteisom.com/

**If you live in or around NY and want to see him, send me a PM. I'll sneak you in =p ***

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Photography in SRF
PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 5:45 pm 
Senior Member
User avatar
Offline

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 4024
Location:
Guildwars2
Went to Rodney Smith's presentation. He seems like a great guy and he definitely knows his arts and craft but definitely not the energy of a 25 year old man.

*graduating this june, so I might have more extra time to FINALLY continue this*

_________________
Image
ImageAlastor Crow


Last edited by inky on Tue May 17, 2011 5:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group